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20130201
20130209
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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
with all these different languages and religions and basically for the first 50 years, almost certainly the first several decades people back in washington were saying what have we done here? we conquered this land but we don't understand it and we can't govern it. we should just give it all back to mexico. it's too hard to run this place. there was so much violence and slavery. there was the hostagetaking and it was just unfamiliar country that people in washington didn't know what to do with. so that is part to. part three is really about carson's role in the conquest of the novel hope people and everything he did with that. is a sort of the final act of his long career and that's probably what he is best known for, the sort of a scorched earth campaign that he led into nobilo country that resulted in their conquest and their removal from their beloved land and this great experiment that went on to try to force the novel hope to become -- to settle down and become farmers and christians living on these reservations on the border of texas. it's a big sprawling book that has many parts
. religion does well. this wall behind the paperback fiction combat rolls out here on a steady basis. both for locals and visitors who want something light to read. the author breakfast meats here all winter long before the metropolitan opera, which comes to santa fe along with millions of other viewers across the world. there is a breakfast and a lecture here. we do a lot with music and arts. the history of santa fe is vivid with two major cultures. native american, hispanic, and the anglo. now, that is actually oversimplifying things, but each one carries such a heritage that the writers are anxious to share. we boast the best of the young native american writers working today. we do events here. we boast the best spanish colonial art market. we sell books at the indian market, which is the largest art market in the world. for many years we have sold looks in the spanish market. again, the largest hispanic market in the world. we are falling all over each other but the sharing and the support that is universal makes it such a wonderfully exciting place to be. >> in the very early day, sa
freedom of expression, freedom of religion, those are not just american values. the world agreed to those values and we are going to stand up for them. it is not always easy. we have to pick our time. on the first level, do what we do because it is in our interests. we have to continue to do that. as you got to the second level, how you adapt that to the world of today requires us to be more clever we are trying to do that. countering violent extremism. maybe there are 50,000 violent homicidal extremist in the world. but they are able to maximize their impact and their messaging through the internet. what we have tried to do is to get in there with them, to undermine them and to rebut them. it is something we did in the cold war. more lessons i think we can transfer from the cold war to today. we don't have some monolithic soviet union. we were engaged in pushing out our ideas and our values, refuting communist propaganda. the cold war ended. "democracy has triumphed. we do not have to do that anymore." that's a terrible mistake. i have tried to convince congress and others if we do not h
into the seventh day. >>> leon panetta talks about his catholic religion. >> remores of muhammed ali's death are premature. >> good morning to you. i'm richard lui. we begin with a developing tragedy in southern california. a bus carrying a tour group from tijuana collided with two other vehicles killing eight and injuring dozens more. authorities say the driver reported brake problems as the bus came down the mountain. it rear ended a car before flipping and hitting a pickup truck that was hauling a trailer. passengers described the scene. >> starts to move so fast, and the people start screaming.
the organization that it is religious and they want their employees to be similar religion. >> gregg: and they have every right. >> it's called the ministerial exception. it's in case law. it's exactly on point. if you are religious entity and focus is on that, there is a standard. they can make selections and appointments with hiring that are the same religious ilk. >> forprofit and nonprofit and you bring in the fair employment housing act. >> gregg: that is good point. by the way, that supreme court decision that we cited, due drew distinction forprofit and not. >> they are saying it's partially not for profit. this school says it is for profit, but i think that the court is going to still be the ministerial exception rule not for not for profits. >> gregg: if there is anybody that is performing a ministerial duty isn't it the teacher in the classroom, it's not the janitor. >> exactly right. >> that is the distinction in the supreme court case. >> gregg: ministerial distinction prevails. >> the ministers and teachers and not ministers. so it doesn't necessarily prevail. second of all, a minister
the swamp and what it does, it is radicalizing people that are standing up against militants using religion as a mobilizing force. so i think that drones as an instrument may have had some secrecy in terms of position, but -- and it's like saying, well, we can't allow u.s. f-16s to come in, we use our own to run anti-terror operations when we can, when we are able to move the population and protect them. so drones are now -- we don't see them as productive at all. >> what do you tell the germ's staff -- what do you tell the staff -- >> you need to be a fly on that committee wall. >> jonathan. >> i think we are all. on the same page. members of the general's staff on where the future of this -- pakistan has to take ownership of all anti-terror operations, absolutely all of them for them to be sustainable and to be seen as legitimate in the eyes of our people. you know, there have been a lot of drone strikes next door also. and in any case, you know that al qaeda is the whole al qaeda high valleys is pretty much through our cooperation and joint efforts. and that's something this administrati
, they would learn about each other's religion. at the boxing match, just before the bell rang, one of the boxes made the sign of the cross. the rabbi nudged the priest and asked what that meant. the priest says, it does not mean a thing if he cannot fight. [laughter] we bless ourselves with the hope that everything will be ok in this country. it does not mean a damn thing unless you are willing to fight for it. my message to you is that it does not mean a damn thing if you are not willing to fight for the american dream, a dream my parents had, a dream of giving our children a better life, a dream of always maintaining a government of, by, and for people. that course of duty is now passing to a new generation. with it passes the responsibility to never stop fighting for that better future. thank you very much. god bless you. god bless the united states of america. [applause] i will take a few questions. call ahead. >> thank you. thank you for coming to georgetown university and talking to us. i am in the security studies program here. i am taking a class on u.s. defense budgeting.
, freedom of religion, those are not just american values. the world agree to those values and the declaration, universal declaration of human rights and will stand up to them. it's not always easy in the have to pick our time. we can't be shortsighted or to penicillin continue to stand up for them. on the fundamental first level, we do what we do because it's in our security interest from economic interest in moral interest and we have to continue to do that. but as you go to the second level, how you adapt that to the world of today requires us to be more clever, more agile and wish i had do that. for example are adtran, -- there are those who estimate that maybe there are 50,000 violent homicidal extremists in the world, but they are able to maximize their impact and their messaging through the internet. but we try to do is say briefly mention is to get in there with them, undermine them and we've got them. it is something i did quite well in the cold war. the wife done this job, the more lessons i think we can transfer from the cold war to today. we don't have some mono
of religion, those are not just american values. the world agreed to those values in the declaration, universal declaration of human rights and will stand up for them. it's not always easy and we have to pick our time. we can't be shortsighted or did, but will continue to stand up for them. and the fundamental first level, we do what we do because it's in our security interest, economic interests in more interests and we have to continue to do that. but then as you go to the second level, how you adapt that to the world that today requires us to be more clever, more agile and were trying to do that. for example, countering violent extremism, does this to me there are maybe 50,000 violent homicidal extremists in the world, but they are able to maximize their impact and messaging today and are not and what we try to do is to get in there with him, to undermine non-and to rebut them. to dissent than we did quite well in the cold war. the more i've done this job, the more i think we can transfer from the cold war to today. no, we don't have some monolithic communist soviet union. but we
other's religion. just before the bell rang, one of the boxers made the sign of the cross. the rabbi nudged the priest and said, what does that mean? the priest said it doesn't mean a darn thing if you can't fight. [laughter] we bless ourselves with the hope that everything will be okay in this country. but very frankly, it won't mean a thing unless you're willing to fight for it. so my message to you, to the students in this audience, but it doesn't mean a thing if you are not willing to fight for the american dream. the dream that my parents had. the dream of giving our children a better life. the dream of maintaining a government for the people. that torch of duty is now passing to a new generation. with that passes the responsibility to never stop fighting for that better future. thank you, very much. god bless you. and god bless the united states of america. [applause] [applause] [applause] >> thank you. [applause] okay, i will take a few questions. >> thank you, thank you secretary panetta for talking to us. i am in the security studies program here at georgetown. i am taking
time. it does not matter whether the person is jewish or whether they are any religion. that is a salutation, a greeting of goodwill. we have got to get over this sensitivity. it keeps people from saying what they really believe. i am reminded of a successful young businessman. he loved to buy his mother exotic gifts for mother's day and ran out of ideas. then he ran across these birds. they cost $5,000 apiece, they could dance, they could sing, they could talk. he bought two of them and send them to his mother, could not wait to call him. what did you think of those birds? she said, they were good. [laughter]he said, no, no, you did not eat those birds. they cost $5,000 -- they could dance, sing, talk. she said, they should have said something. [laughter]that is where we end up to if we do not speak up for what we believe. what we need to do -- [applause]what we need to do in this pc world is forget about unanimity of speech and unanimity of thought. we need to concentrate on being respectful to those people with whom we disagree. that is when we begin to make real pro
of religion with tower of babel, we know that language is essential to having an economy and country that stays together. this is a public school and the language used by the government of the united states most often is tkpwhreurb, english and these kids should be reciting the pledge of allegiance in english. >>gretchen: liz? >> i understand what you're saying. but i also believe if the children are speaking other languages, they should be allowed to say the pledge of allegiance in their languages. we live in a melting pot here in the united states where there are many different cultures and children speak many different languages and i feel they should be allowed to say the pledge of allegiance in their language if that's something they choose to do. >>gretchen: the thing for me, ladies, i guess i break it down on to what they were actually reciting. if they were reciting a nursery rhyme, then i don't think we'd be having this discussion. they were reciting the pledge of allegiance, which is our patriotic pledge to this country. and in fact, the immigration debate on capitol hill r
, freedom of religion, those are not just american values. the world agreed to those values and we are going to stand up for them. it is not always easy. we have to pick our time. on the first level, do what we do because it is in our interests. we have to continue to do that. as you got to the second level, how you adapt that to the world of today requires us to be more we are trying to do that. count during a violent extremism. maybe there are 50,000 violent homicidal extremist in the world. but they are able to maximize their impact and their messaging through the internet. what we have tried to do is to get in there with them, to undermine them and to rebut them. it is something we did in the cold war. more lessons i think we can transfer from the cold war to today. we don't have some monolithic soviet union. we were engaged in pushing out our ideas and our values, refuting communist propaganda. the cold war ended. "democracy has triumphed. we do not have to do that anymore." that's a terrible mistake. i have tried to convince congress and others if we do not have an up-to-date broadcast
are going to be the ones running this at the end. >> she is going to drug you what america's religion which is democracy and everyone in america loves democracy. on a grant that. i plead guilty to taking that. >> and i am right there with you but this is not about -- there is much more going on here to get anybody that knows the middle east knows that the borders were drawn around people that don't necessarily want to live together. we have seen this in israel, palestinians and jews do not want to live together. now, we could say let's have democracy and have a one state solution. joost not want a one-stop solution and palestinians do not want a one-stop solution. it's not about the democracy in palestine and israel and its about the democracy in iraq. we said was going to make democracy and cast the sunni is down. they were not. they pushed the sunnis out of every job in the military, the government, the education system and that is what is going to have been anybody that thinks that when the takeover and syria that they are going to incorporate the national institutions into the next stat
when i talk about freedom of expression, freedom of religion, those are not just american values. the world agreed to those values and we are going to stand up for them. it is not always easy. we have to pick our time. on the first level, do what we do because it is in our interests. as you got to the second level, how you adapt that to the world of today requires us to be more clever we are trying to do that. count during a violent extremism. maybe there are 50,000 violent homicidal extremist in the world. but they are able to maximize their impact and their messaging through the internet. what we have tried to do is to get in there with them, to undermine them and to rebut them. it is something we did in the cold war. more lessons i think we can transfer from the cold war to today. we don't have some monolithic soviet union. we were engaged in pushing out our ideas and our values, refuting communist propaganda. the cold war ended. "democracy has triumphed. we do not have to do that anymore." that's a terrible mistake. i have tried to convince congress and others if we do not ha
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)